The thermic effect of food (TEF) is a term that refers to the amount of energy needed by the body to digest, absorb, and metabolize what we eat. If you rather listen than read check out my most recent podcast regarding TEF. TEF is closely related to the macronutrient composition of our diets. It has been shown to have positive effects on our health and can be used to help us lose weight and/or maintain our current weight. Let’s delve deeper into why this phenomenon is important and how it helps us reach our goals.

How Does TEF Work
The thermic effect of food works by increasing the metabolic rate, or the number of calories burned while digesting food. This means that when you eat, your body has to burn more calories than when it’s not eating in order to break down and absorb whatever you ate. This process actually increases your metabolism, which in turn helps you burn more calories throughout the day.

Different Macronutrients = Different Effects
It’s important to note that different macronutrients—fats, carbohydrates, proteins—have different effects on TEF. For example, proteins tend to have the highest thermic effect because they require more energy for digestion than fats or carbohydrates do. In fact, one study showed that protein had a 30% thermogenic response compared with only 3-10% for fats or carbohydrates! So if your goal is to increase your metabolism and burn more calories throughout the day, then focusing on getting enough protein in your diet is key.

The Benefits of Increasing Your Metabolism Through TEF
Increasing your metabolism through TEF has many benefits beyond just burning more calories throughout the day. For one thing, increased metabolism can help boost energy levels so that you feel energized all day long without relying on stimulants like caffeine or sugary drinks. It can also help regulate blood sugar levels so that you don’t experience extreme highs and lows after meals. And lastly, increased metabolism can help improve hormone balance since hormones are integral for regulating your body’s metabolic rate!


In conclusion, understanding how thermic effect of food works is an essential part of maintaining a healthy lifestyle as well as reaching any health-related goals such as losing weight or increasing energy levels. Eating a balanced diet with plenty of high quality proteins will ensure that you get enough nutrients while also increasing your metabolic rate through TEF. Taking advantage of this phenomenon could be a great way for middle aged men looking for improved health and wellbeing!

Enjoyed what you read? Check out more of my most recent blog articles 🙂

Coconut oil has quickly become a popular cooking ingredient. But why use coconut oil to cook with? Keep reading or if you rather listen I just did a micro-podcast regarding coconut oil. For one, it has a high smoke point and is an excellent choice for sautéing, baking, and roasting. Additionally, it is packed with healthy fats that are beneficial to your health. Let’s explore the health benefits and uses of coconut oil in the kitchen.

The Benefits of Coconut Oil
Coconut oil contains healthy fatty acids that can benefit your body when consumed in moderation. These fats have been linked to helping reduce inflammation and promoting good cholesterol levels, which can help lower your risk for heart disease. Coconut oil is also composed mainly of saturated fats, which can help you maintain a healthy weight as well as reduce inflammation in your body. It also contains lauric acid, which may help support your immune system and increase healthy bacteria in the gut.

The Smoke Point
Another benefit of using coconut oil for cooking is its relatively high smoke point. The smoke point refers to the temperature at which an oil begins to break down and emit smoke — this can affect both the flavor and nutrition of your food. The smoke point of refined coconut oil is 450°F, which is higher than most other cooking oils and makes it ideal for frying or sautéing food at high temperatures without compromising its nutritional value.

Versatility
One of the best things about coconut oil is its versatility. It can be used to replace vegetable oil in almost any recipe – from baking cakes to roasting vegetables – as well as being used as a spread or salad dressing ingredient. Plus, it adds a subtle hint of sweetness that other oils don’t have, making it perfect for sweet treats as well.

If you’re looking for a healthy alternative to vegetable oils when cooking, then consider giving coconut oil a try! Its high smoke point makes it ideal for frying or sautéing foods at high temperatures without losing nutritional value or flavor; it has several health benefits due to its saturated fat content; and best of all, it’s incredibly versatile so you can use it in baking, frying, sautéing, spreading on toast—you name it! Not only will your meals taste great but you’ll also be doing something good for your body with every bite!

Source: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/30395784/

There is a lot of conflicting information out there when it comes to whether or not fruit is good for you. Some people say that you should avoid fruit because it is high in sugar particularly fructose (ie. Robert Lustig), while others claim that fruit is an essential part of a healthy diet (i.e. Jay Feldman). So, what is the truth?

Generally speaking, fruit is a healthy food that can provide you with a range of important nutrients. However, it is also true that some fruits are higher in sugar than others. In general, fresh fruits are healthier than processed or canned fruits. This is because fresh fruits contain more fiber, vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants.

The health benefits of fructose

Fructose is a naturally occurring sugar found in many fruits and vegetables. It is also the main sugar used to sweeten processed foods and beverages. Although fructose has received some negative publicity in recent years, it is actually a bioenergetic nutrient that can have some health benefits when consumed in moderation. For instance, fructose can help to replenish glycogen stores and promote muscle recovery after exercise. In addition, fructose has been shown to decrease inflammation and improve insulin sensitivity. Therefore, while fructose should not be consumed in excess, it can actually have some health benefits when consumed in moderation as part of a healthy diet. I am experimenting with adding fruit to my diet as a way to increase my carb/calorie consumption.

Importance of honey and other carbohydrates in human evolution and the Hadza’s diet

The Hadza, an indigenous group in Tanzania, are one of the few remaining hunter-gatherer societies in the world. Their diet is largely based on what they can scavenge or hunt, and honey is a key part of their nutrient intake. In fact, honey provides more than just carbohydrates – it also contains essential vitamins and minerals that are vital for human health.

Honey has been part of the human diet for thousands of years, and it is thought to have played a role in human evolution. The ability to process honey – which is high in fructose – may have helped our ancestors to survive during periods of food scarcity. Today, honey is still an important part of the Hadza diet, and it provides them with the nutrients they need to stay healthy.

Protective Effects of Honey against Metabolic Syndrome

Metabolic syndrome is a condition that is characterized by a cluster of risk factors that increase the likelihood of developing cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. These risk factors include obesity, high blood pressure, high blood sugar, and unhealthy cholesterol levels. Recently, there has been growing interest in the potential role of honey in preventing or managing metabolic syndrome. Several studies have shown that honey can help to lower blood sugar and LDL cholesterol levels, as well as improve blood pressure and body weight. Additionally, honey has been shown to reduce inflammation, which is a key driver of metabolic syndrome. While more research is needed to fully understand the mechanisms involved, there is growing evidence that honey may be a promising natural therapy for metabolic syndrome.

Fructose enhances mineral retention

Minerals are essential nutrients that our body needs for various functions. They can be found in many different foods, but some minerals are more easily absorbed than others. Fructose is a type of sugar that is found in fruits and honey. It has been shown to enhance the absorption of minerals, especially iron. This is because fructose helps to increase the amount of time that minerals stay in the intestine. As a result, fructose can help to ensure that our body gets the minerals it needs for good health.

Fructose can protect against endotoxin damage

Endotoxin is a toxin that can cause damage to the endothelial cells lining blood vessels. This damage can lead to inflammation, thrombosis, and endothelial dysfunction. Fructose has been shown to protect against endotoxin damage by reducing the production of endothelial cell-derived cytokines and chemokines. In addition, fructose inhibits the endothelial cell-mediated generation of reactive oxygen species. These findings suggest that fructose may have potential therapeutic benefits in the treatment of endotoxin-related diseases.

Fruits could be a great addition to your diet especially if you are looking to add some healthy carbohydrates to your day. They are less toxic, and easier on the gut than eating some plants so it might be worth self experimenting with them and seeing how you feel!

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Many people ask me when the best time to intermittent fast is. The answer may surprise you – there is no one “best” time. In fact, the best time to intermittent fast may vary depending on your goals and lifestyle.

That said, there are a few general tips that can help you determine when the best time to intermittent fast is for you. In this blog post, I’ll share with you 3 tips to help you find the best time to intermittent fast.

1. Consider your goals.

The first step in finding the best time to intermittent fast is to consider your goals. What are you hoping to achieve by intermittent fasting? Are you looking to improve your health? Lose weight? Gain muscle? Once you know your goals, you can start to narrow down the best time for you to intermittent fast.

2. Consider your lifestyle.

The second step in finding the best time to intermittent fast is to consider your lifestyle. Do you have a busy work schedule? Are you always on-the-go? Or do you have a more relaxed lifestyle? Depending on your answers, certain times of day may be better suited for fasting than others.

3. Try out different times and see what works best for you.

The third and final step in finding the best time to intermittent fast is to try out different times and see what works best for you. There’s no right or wrong answer here – it all comes down to trial and error. Start with shorter fasting periods and work your way up from there. And remember, if at first you don’t succeed, try, try again!

Conclusion:

Intermittent fasting is a great way to improve your health, lose weight, and have boundaries around when to eat. But finding the best time to intermittent fast can be tricky. In this blog post, we’ve shared 3 tips to help you find the best time for you to start fasting. Remember, there is no one “right” answer – it all comes down to trial and error. So what are you waiting for? Give it a try today!

And make sure your dog doesn?t either!

My dog?Louie?found and ingested?rat poison?and I had to take him to the ER. In a case like this they make him?throw up?and then give him?activated charcoal?to absorb the rest of the poison. It was scary but Louie should be?fine??

What?s the lesson from all of this?

1. Make sure you have rat poison traps that are locked correctly
2. Scan your whole backyard and double check everything (which I thought I did)
3. Even if poison tastes good don?t eat it

I thought since we are on the poison theme and it?s the end of the year I would list?my top 8 foods to AVOID! (no particular order and could probably find more)

8. Processed Table Salt?? not all salt is created equal ??avoid processed table salt?because it causes your body to retain fluids and most table ?salt? is?iodized?and puts people at risk for abnormally large thyroid gland and cause?thyroid-related autoimmune disorders.?Excess iodine in the diet can also lead to nausea, headaches and unhealthy hormone levels.?Use either Himalayan or Celtic Sea Salt

7. Margarine ? the?vegetable oils?used to make regular margarine?s today have a high concentration of polyunsaturated fats and the process of hardening those oils to create the more solid structure of margarine, known as hydrogenation, generates artificial trans fats. (that?s not good)?Use grass-fed Butter or Ghee

6. Kids Cereal?? i won?t get all sciencey (made up word :)) sugar, lots of processing, and artificial flavoring ??Try Go Raw Cereal Sprouted Granola

5. Microwave Popcorn ? The?bag?itself contains chemicals and with ingredients such as partially hydrogenated soybean oil, palm oil, salt and?TBHQ? stands for ?Tertiary Butylhydroquinone.? It?s a dead giveaway that you?shouldn?t be eating this, if food companies have to use an acronym for a long chemical name on the ingredient label.?Make your own?

popcorn ? here are the ingredients to one ? (Food Babe?s Super-food popcorn)

4. Fancy Coffee Drinks?? Now that the holidays are around the corner we see even more of these fancy drinks. What we don?t see is the?50 grams of sugarin them. These can be addicting because of the sugar and caffeine.?Just stick to the basic drinks and celebrate the holidays another way??

3. Factory Farmed Meat (and fish)?You are what?they?eat, and if the livestock or fish that you?re grilling up for dinner is fed hormones, drugs and anunnatural diet?grown using?chemical pesticides and fertilizers, that?s not good news for you!!?Eat grass fed meat and wild fish

2. White Flour (i.e. bagels, most breads, muffins and pastries) I know it?s tempting but once you stop eating it you will find that you won?t be tempted as much. White flour is really nothing more than?refined carbohydrates?and can contribute to weight gain. Enriched white flour causes your body to scream through the ride of a sugar high roller coaster. ??Use Ezekial bread, sourdough bread or bread you can see the grains.?

(or just avoid it all together??

1. Soft Drinks or Diet Drinks?? We all know this by now???Sugar, artificial flavoring?blah, blah, blah?Drink water, tea or black coffee

I could go on and on with this list but it?s all about taking?small steps?and eliminating these foods/drinks that can set you?off trackto reach your goals.

If you have a soft drink a?few times a year there is nothing wrong with thatjust make sure it is not a daily or weekly occurrence.

Bottom Line:?Don?t poison yourself or your dog??

Have a great weekend!

Brian

Is breakfast really that important? ?It?depends?who you talk to?

Mainstream media and big cereal companies (e.g., Kellogg) have always stressed that breakfast is the most?important?meal of the day.

I would beg to differ.

Breakfast is the most?marketed?meal of the day. Why?

Because any company that convinces you to eat their cereal, bagel, or Pop Tart owns your breakfast, as most people eat the same breakfast daily.

nutrition | breakfast | fasting | Brian Gryn

Studies?show that due to our stringent breakfast routines, consumers have strong brand loyalty to certain cereals.

How about those?Tony the Tiger?ads that got tens of thousands of children to eat Frosted Flakes every morning for years?!

(I actually was one of those kids! Before I got into health.??)

Most breakfast cereals rank just behind cookies, candy, ice cream, and sugary drinks as a source of?dietary sugar.

Also, instant oatmeal and/or instant cream of wheat is highly processed as well.

So two questions:

1. Should we eat breakfast at all?

That is up to you? If you are eating something?processed?(bagel, muffin, pancakes, donuts, or pastries) or with large amounts of?sugar?(most yogurts or anything with??instant??in front of it) ? I would?avoid?breakfast, and have black coffee or green tea or?what I have.??

You can break your fast with a?healthy lunch?and save time in the morning.

Also, by skipping breakfast, you?balance?out your fasting and feeding times.

The human body is?designed?to go periods without food.

Most people think that eating first thing in the A.M. will give you the fuel to start the day, but your body has?plenty of left over fuel and?glycogen (when that runs out ? fat) stored inside of you.

Glycogen?is your most easily accessible energy source and can last for days.

If we?start eating?the minute we roll out of bed and do not stop until we go to sleep, we spend almost all of our time in a?fed state.

2. What do we eat for breakfast if you are going to have it?

Eggs?are a good choice, and you can get creative with how you make them (scrambled, omelette, sunny side up, etc.) and what you put in them (veggies, cheese, avocado, etc.).

Most importantly, avoid?anything processed or that you would throw in your?microwave. So no?bagel, muffin, or pastry with the eggs.

So the?bottom line?is that marketers and big corps want you to think that breakfast is the most important meal of the day, when it actually is just?another meal.

For a while, I was?convinced?as well, but after researching and skipping breakfast myself, I realized it wasn?t a big deal.

I had even more energy to work out and/or go to work all in a?fasted state.

Also, short-term fasting leads to?several changes?in the body that make fat burning easier. This includes?reduced insulin, increased?growth hormone, enhanced?epinephrine?signaling (adrenaline), and a small boost in metabolism.??

So figure out if?breakfast?is that important for you, and you will see that it?s not all it?s hyped up to be.

Have a great day!

A question I always get from friends, family, and clients is what bars should I buy to snack on?

It has gotten quite confusing going to the store and choosing from at least a dozen different bars.

The first question I would ask is do you have any allergies?

The second question I would ask is do you have any dietary restrictions (kosher, vegan, vegetarian, etc.)?

Health nutrition bars recommendation & review | Brian Gryn

The?quick and easy?way to tell which bar to choose is pick the bar with the?least?amount of ingredients and make sure you can?pronounce?each one.?Pay attention to the first ingredient because that has the highest % content in the bar

Avoid the following ingredients (these are just 5 common ones):

  1. Brown Rice Syrup (raises your blood sugar (high glycemic))
  2. Soy Protein Isolate (cheap and definitely NOT a high-quality protein)
  3. Sugar Alcohols ?(tough to digest and can cause gas, bloating, etc.)
  4. Agave Syrup (yep, has more fructose than high fructose corn syrup)
  5. Soy Lecithin (processed food additive that helps things stick together)

Bars I recommend:

LaraBar ? 6 ingredients ? Kosher ? Vegan ? Non-GMO ? Dairy Free ? Gluten Free ? larabar.com

Rx Bar ? 7 ingredients ???Non GMO?? ?? ??No Dairy?? ?? ???No Soy?? ?? ???No Gluten ? rxbar.com

Amrita Bars ? Solid ingredients ? Vegan ? Raw ? Gluten Free ? Soy Free ? Peanut Free ? Dairy Free ? amritahealthfoods.com

Youbars.com ? make your own bars! ?No excuses for bad ingredients??

Go Raw Bars ? 4-6 ingredients ? Organic and Sprouted (free of anything harmful) ? goraw.com

Hope this helps!

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